Clean energy requires innovative financing as well as innovative ideas

Clean Capital News

By Arman Kazemi

October 23, 2014

In the midst of a tough few weeks for the public markets, a new private financing marketplace is promising investors a seven per cent return on solar installation projects.

Since its private launch on October 7, Wunder Capital already has $614,000 of its 1 million dollars in planned funding subscribed to by investors.

The new platform essentially provides a portal for accredited investors to choose among 50 “top tier” solar installers and invest in the projects that best suit their portfolio needs.

Private investors now have the tools, according to a Wunder press release, to easily build a solar portfolio and “reap the returns previously accessible to only the largest institutional investors and corporations.”

While among the latest portals to dig up money for cleantech, Wunder is certainly not the first financing innovation to hit clean energy in recent months.

In the same week that Wunder Capital launched its private marketplace, solar equipment lease-provider SolarCity introduced a loan system allowing customers to pay back money for purchasing PV equipment based on the kWh their setup yields each month.

And earlier in September, Canada’s investment platform the Funding Portal partnered with the federal government to help Canadian clean energy companies and researchers access domestically-available financing.

As a recent article in the National Post suggests, publically available funds, such as that offered by the SDTC, are often inaccessible to early startups due to tough prerequisites, which often ask potential recipients to have pre-existing commercial or financial backing.

Platforms like Wunder and the Cleantech Funding Portal, as well as other crowdsourcing initiatives, may increasingly provide this middle ground for companies, customers and clean energy investors alike to support burgeoning industry needs.



Photo Credit: Dept of Energy Solar Decathlon