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Marketing Research Seminars

Details of our upcoming seminars are posted here:


Date: Friday, April 20, 2018

Speaker: Luke Clark, Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia
Topic: Deconstructing the Slot Machine: People, Products, Environments
Time: 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Place: Henry Angus 966

Abstract:  Gambling is a widespread example of recreational risk-taking that becomes excessive and potentially addictive in a subset of the population. The dominant medical model of Gambling Disorder is of a ‘behavioural addiction’ underpinned by neurobiological factors (e.g. brain chemistry, genetics, personality) that render a subset of people vulnerable to gambling problems. This approach neglects the significant role played by gambling products and aspects of the gambling environments. In many jurisdictions including B.C., modern slot machines are regarded as a relatively high-risk form of gambling. At a psychological level, these are sophisticated and complex games. I will describe some of our recent research on the psychological effects of modern slot machines. Some of this work focusses on individual game ingredients; for example, how ‘stopper buttons’ potentially fuel the illusion of control. Other work considers game ‘immersion’ as a cumulative effect of many game features, and which is associated with risk of disordered gambling.


Date: Friday, April 27, 2018

Speaker: Steven Heine, Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia
Topic: DNA is not destiny: How rational decision-making breaks down in the face of genetics
Time: 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Place: Henry Angus 966

Abstract:  People the world over are essentialist thinkers – they are attracted to the idea that hidden essences make things as they are. And because genetic concepts remind people of essences, they tend to think of genes in ways similar to essences. That is, people tend to think about genetic causes as immutable, deterministic, homogenous and discrete, and natural. With the advent of the genomics revolution and direct-to-consumer genomics companies, people are coming into contact with much genetic information relevant to themselves, yet they struggle to make sense of this information. I will discuss how our essentialist biases lead people to think irrationally about health, GMO products, sex, race, sexual orientation, and moral responsibility whenever these are described in genetic terms. Moreover, I’ll talk about how we might be able to reduce the harmful consequences of essentialism.


Date: Friday, May 4, 2018

Speaker: Mike Daniels, Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia
Topic: TBA
Time: 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Place: Henry Angus 966

Abstract:  TBA


Date: Friday, November 30, 2018

Speaker: Juanjuan Zhang, MIT Sloan School of Management
Topic: TBA
Time: 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Place: Henry Angus 966

Abstract:  TBA